web analytics

Two weekends ago, I finally got the chance to experience El Toucanet Lodge near Copey de Dota, Costa Rica. This highland birding site has popped up on the Costa Rican birding grapevine on a number of occasions so I was enthused about birding there while guiding the local Birding Club of Costa Rica. I have guided a number of birders who have enthralled me with tales of El Toucanet’s exciting hummingbird action, easy views of quetzals, great food, and quality hospitality. After staying there, I echo their sentiments and definitely recommend the place when birding the Talamancas.

birding Costa Rica

The majority of birders get their fill of high elevation birding in Costa Rica at Savegre Mountain Hotel in San Gerardo de Dota. Since the oak forests there are more accessible than at El Toucanet, you can’t go wrong with birding at Savegre Mountain Lodge, but it’s also more expensive. For a more moderately priced option, El Toucanet is $30 cheaper per night on average and is situated at a lower elevation with drier forest that turns up an interesting suite of species. In addition to good birding around the hotel, birders who come with a rental vehicle will find it to be a good site to use as a base for birding higher elevations.

At the lodge itself, two hummingbird feeders were enough to entertain us with views of the following species:

Violet Sabrewing

birding Costa Rica

Stripe-tailed Hummingbird

birding Costa Rica

Green Violetear

birding Costa Rica

Magenta-throated Woodstar

birding Costa Rica

Scintillant Hummingbird

birding Costa Rica

Purple-throated Mountain-Gem

birding Costa Rica

and the good old Rufous-tailed Hummingbird.

birding Costa Rica

There were also camera shy Green-crowned Brilliants, Magnificent Hummingbirds, and in flowering Ingas on the property, a few Steely-vented Hummingbirds. White-throated Mountain-Gems, and Volcano and Fiery-throated Hummingbirds seen at higher elevations gave us a respectable total of thirteen hummingbirds species seen during our stay.

On the non-hummingbird side of page, some of the highlights at the lodge and in nearby, similar habitats were Dark Pewee (common), Barred Becard (fairly common), Spotted Wood-Quail (heard only although they sometimes show up at the lodge), Collared Trogon, Black and white Becard (very uncommon species in Costa Rica), and Rough-legged Tyrannulet. Much to my chagrin, this last bird was also a heard only as it would have been a lifer! I tried calling it in but the bird just wouldn’t come close enough to see it- all the more reason to head back up there!

Flame-colored Tanagers were fairly common and came to the lodge feeders once in a while

birding Costa Rica

but the lodge namesake seemed to be pretty uncommon. We still saw a few Emerald Toucanets but not as many as I had expected; maybe they are more common at other times of the year or are down in numbers like the Resplendent Quetzal. As with other areas in Costa Rica, the wacky fruiting season seems to have had an impact upon quetzal numbers so it took us a few days to actually see one. This is in contrast to the norm at El Tocuanet whereby guests often view more than one of these fancy birds on the daily quetzal tour (free for guests).

birding Costa Rica

A Resplendent Quetzal near El Toucanet being resplendent.

One of our best birdies during our visit was Silver-throated Jay. This tough endemic needs primary highland oak forest and, at El Tocuanet, is only regularly found at higher elevations where the road to Providencia flattens out. It was nice to get this rarity for the year even if it was a pain to get clear views of it in the densely foliaged crowns of massive, moss-draped oaks. That same area also hosted three or four calling, unseen Buff-fronted Quail-Doves, the aforementioned high elevation hummingbirds, and a mixed flock highlighted by Buffy Tuftedcheeks. We also had our weirdest bird of the trip in that area- a Magnificent Frigatebird! If it wanted to masquerade as an American Swallow-tailed Kite, those raptors weren’t buying it and demonstrated their discontent by dive-bombing the modern day Pterodactyl.

We also had calling quetzals around there, and at night, heard Dusky Nightjar, Bare-shanked Screech-Owl, and Costa Rican Pygmy-Owl. During our after dark excursion, we tried for the near mythical Unspotted Saw-whet but didn’t get any response. Maybe it occurs at higher elevations? Maybe it just doesn’t like birders? No matter because I am going to get that feathered gnome before 2011 comes to an end!

Our final morning was when we got the quetzal (thanks to the owners son Kenny who whistled it in) in addition to being our best morning of birding. Streak-breasted Treehunter hung out at a nesting hole (burrow) in a quarry. Barred Becard and bathing Long-tailed Silky-Flycatchers entertained in the same area. Tufted Flycatchers, migrant Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Dark Pewee were sallying off perches like jumping jack flash, and Yellow-bellied Siskins did what all birds should do-

birding Costa Rica

sing from exposed, eye level perches for long periods of time at close distances. Challenges are OK but relaxed, easy birding is always better!

One drawback to birding near El Toucanet is that hunting still occurs in the area. We didn’t see any guys with guns or floppy eared, baying dogs, but we were told that locals do hunt in the Los Santos Forest Reserve (illegally). I suspected as much because of the flighty behavior of birds in the area (except at El Toucanet where they know they are safe). Even so, aside from making it a bit more challenging to watch birds close up, I doubt that it affects the birding all that much. Black Guans are probably more difficult to see but you may still have a good chance for them when birding the long road through Providencia and the highway. Much of this underbirded road cuts through beautiful forest. If you have the time and vehicle, please bird it and let us know what you see! I plan on surveying the road sometime this year and will blog about it.

In the meantime, check out El Toucanet! I bet the area around the lodge holds more surprises, the fireplace is certifiably cozy, the food very good, and the owners as nice as can be.

Here was a very cool surprise that I ran into just next to the lodge- my lifer Godson’s Montane Pit-Viper!

birding Costa Rica

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Free wordpress skins | Free drupal 5 themes | Free joomla 1.5 templates | Mediawiki skins | Free pligg themes | Website templates" | Customizable Website Templates |

8 Responses to “Birding El Toucanet Lodge, Costa Rica”

  1. Enjoyed your report of El Toucanet immensely! Have stayed there twice,including last month- you may have even seen some Quetzal photos of mine that I took to Gary and Edna- I hope they had them hanging up in the lodge. Your reports are greatly appreciated-and helpful!

  2. @Ron- Glad to hear you liked the report and that it’s helpful. With guiding season slowing down, I hope to have more time to report on other sites. I did notice some nice quetzal images on the wall of the lodge.

  3. Hi Patrick,
    Thanks for the info on your site. You might like taking a look at our new book on the Hummingbirds of Costa Rica. A preview can be seen at Hewlett Packard’s MagCloud:
    http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/396343
    Enjoy.
    Cindy

  4. Hey Patrick!

    Thank you for recommending this great spot to me. Although I didn’t see all the species you managed to see on your trip to El Toucanet, I did have great views of three different Quetzels. Both Slaty-throated and Collared Redstarts were common, and other good birds seen included, Spotted Wood-Quails (4 seen crossing the road), two Long-tailed Silky Flycatchers, many Yellow-thighed Finches, Spangle-cheeked Tanager at the top of the pass, along with Collared Trogon’s a single Black Guan doing his mechanical sounding flight from tree to tree and many others.

    I have a few I will need you to help ID. Will be sending you these in due course.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Birding in Costa Rica on the Providencia Road
  2. Birding in Costa Rica on the Providencia Road »
  3. Identification Tips When Birding Costa Rica: Small, Plain Hummingbirds Species
  4. Identification Tips When Birding Costa Rica: Small, Plain Hummingbirds Species »

Leave a Reply

You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>